going monolingual?

For a while i’ve heard people talking about using monolingual dictionaries in their target language, but I haven’t yet adopted that practice for some reason. I guess that since i started my chinese studies in a classroom setting, i’m really used to using lots of english all the time.

Lately some things have started to really change my mind. One is reading chinese without looking things up in the dictionary, and the other is reading Keith’s last few blog entries about learning chinese by watching chinese tv dramas. Keith makes many excellent points, especially about the way that drilling yourself with english translations will teach your brain to associate english with everything.

There are some situations in which i can speak and listen to chinese without translating…these are mostly limited to the situations i was forced into while i was in china. Most discussion that would occur in a class or in a chinese restaurant is totally fine, but for a lot of other situations i get lost easily.

It’s interesting for me now to seriously consider the effect of doing all of my chinese study in relation to english. All my anki flashcards have english in the answer, and most of the books i read have 1 page of chinese paired with 1 page of english. Have i been training myself into a corner?

From here on, i think i’m going to change things slightly. I’m still working on the 1 million words of reading, but i’d also like to introduce some tv dramas if i can find any. I’m also changing my Anki cards so that the answers are just in chinese. I still need to find a monolingual chinese dictionary, and perhaps avoid using my digital dictionaries since they are all chinese/english. I guess it’s time for me to really start my own version of “all chinese all the time”. Listening to radio shows has always felt too difficult for me, so maybe i’ll just switch to movies where i get some context more easily….and chinese subtitles so i know what they just said.

2 Responses to going monolingual?

  1. Max says:

    There are more than enough Chinese-> Chinese dictionaries online. You can also download the 现代汉语词典.

  2. Keith says:

    Hey, thanks for mentioning my blog in your post! I’m glad to find that you are writing about your language learning. I have some catching up to do but it looks like all are interesting posts. I’ve added your blog to my RSS feed reading list.

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